diapir

EnglishEdit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek διαπειραίνω (diapeirainō, to pierce through).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

diapir (plural diapirs)

  1. (geology) An intrusion of a ductile rock into an overburden.
    • 1989, Nigel Henbest, "Geologists hit back at impact theory of extinctions", New Scientist, 29 April 1989:
      "If a diapir is outside an established plume it rises at a much slower rate," Loper says.
    • 1994, Peter Olson, "Mechanics of Flood Basalt Magmatism", in Magmatic Systems (ed. Michael P. Ryan), Academic Press (1994), ISBN 0126050708, page 12:
      This final stage is characterized by the cooling and resolidification of the partially molten diapir within the mantle, slow subsidence at the surface, and greatly diminished rates of crustal addition.
    • 2004, Richard Fortey, The Earth: An Intimate History, HarperCollins (2010), ISBN 9780007373338, unnumbered page:
      Deeply buried deposits of sea-salt dome upwards and pass through the overlying strata, as a kind of intrusive lobe, eventually emerging at the surface – the rising tongue is called a diapir.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Last modified on 11 January 2014, at 01:36