Last modified on 1 May 2014, at 21:53

dig in

EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

dig in (third-person singular simple present digs in, present participle digging in, simple past and past participle dug in)

  1. (idiomatic)To begin eating.
    I wanted to say grace before dinner, but the kids were already digging in.
  2. To make a burst of hard work.
    I've got to dig in for a couple of weeks to secure my promotion.
    • 2011 November 5, Phil Dawkes, “QPR 2 - 3 Man City”, BBC Sport:
      Mancini's men were far from their best but dug in to earn a 10th win in 11 league games and an eighth successive victory in all competitions to maintain their five-point lead at the top of the table.
  3. (military) To dig trenches to resist an enemy attack. (This meaning is extended by metaphor to cricket and other situations.)
  4. (idiomatic) To adopt a resolute state of mind (often: to dig in one's feet, heels, etc.)

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit