DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch thoh, from Proto-Germanic *þauh.

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

doch

  1. yet, but, still
  2. but rather

GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German doch, from Old High German doh, from Proto-Germanic *þauh. Cognate to Old English þēah (English though).

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

doch

  1. though; yet; but; however; nevertheless
  2. for all that; after all; but

AdverbEdit

doch

  1. after all; yet; however; nevertheless
    • 1918, Elisabeth von Heyking, Die Orgelpfeifen, in: Zwei Erzählungen, Phillipp Reclam jun. Verlag, page 35:
      Auf dem Bahnhof dann, in dem sich senkenden Nebel, ein Gewühl von Pferden und grauen Gestalten, das zuerst unentwirrbar schien und sich dann doch rasch ordnete.
      On the station then, in the sinking fog, a crowd of horses and gray characters that initially looked inextricable, but then put itself in order swiftly after all.
  2. really; just
  3. (in response to a negative question or statement) yes; surely; really; on the contrary
    Das darfst du nicht sagen. — Doch, doch! —— “You can’t say that. — Yes, I can!”
    Du wirst nicht kommen? — Doch! —— “You won't come? — Oh, yes, I will!”

Usage notesEdit

  • (really, just): As an emphatic particle, doch often stresses a contrast or a certainty. It is used more frequently in German than its nearest English equivalents and is often best translated into English by rephrasing the surrounding sentence.
Last modified on 27 March 2014, at 18:29