Last modified on 22 June 2014, at 01:22

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English fede, feide, *feithe, from Old English fǣhþ, fǣhþu, fǣhþo (hostility, enmity, violence, revenge, vendetta), from Proto-Germanic *faihiþō (hatred, enmity), from Proto-Indo-European *pAik-, *pAig- (ill-meaning, wicked), equivalent to foe +‎ -th. Cognate with Dutch veete (feud), German Fehde (feud, vendetta), Danish fejde (feud, enmity, hostility, war), Swedish fejd (feud, controversy, quarrel, strife), and Old French faide, feide (feud), ultimately from the same Germanic source. Related to foe, fiend.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

feud (plural feuds)

  1. A state of long-standing mutual hostility.
    You couldn't call it a feud exactly, but there had always been a chill between Phil Mickelson and Tiger Woods.
  2. (professional wrestling slang) A staged rivalry between wrestlers.
  3. (obsolete) A combination of kindred to avenge injuries or affronts, done or offered to any of their blood, on the offender and all his race.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
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VerbEdit

feud (third-person singular simple present feuds, present participle feuding, simple past and past participle feuded)

  1. (intransitive) To carry on a feud.
    The two men began to feud after one of them got a job promotion and the other thought he was more qualified.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old French, from Latin feodum.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

feud (plural feuds)

  1. An estate granted to a vassal by a feudal lord in exchange for service
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit
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