gibbous

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from Latin gibbus (humped, hunched), probably cognate with cubō (bend oneself, lie down), Italian gobba (humpback), Greek κύφος (kýfos, humpback, bent), κύβος (kývos, cube, vertebra).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

gibbous (comparative more gibbous, superlative most gibbous)

  1. Characterized by convexity; protuberant.
    • 1886, Thomas Hardy, The Mayor of Casterbridge, chapter 22
      In fact, what these gibbous human shapes specially represented was ready money—money insistently ready [...]
  2. (astronomy) Phase of moon or planet between first quarter and full or between full and last quarter.
  3. Humpbacked.
    • 1697, Dryden, Aeneid, book 8
      A pointed flinty rock, all bare and black,
      Grew gibbous from behind the mountain's back;

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Last modified on 10 April 2014, at 18:03