Last modified on 24 June 2014, at 15:43
See also: hóf, höf, and Hof

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

A loan from German Hof (building, farm, estate; enclosure, courtyard, court).

NounEdit

hof (plural hofs)

  1. Enclosure, court, dwelling, building, house.
    • 1993 May, William, Trevor, Jake's Castle, in Harper's Magazine:
      Ulrike lived in a farm hof, and all around me were the dark blank fields punctuated by a few disparate lights.
    • 2009, Chloe Aridjis, Book of Clouds (New York: Black Cat, 1st edition):
      Like many old houses, this one had a front section, where I lived, and at the back an interior courtyard, the Hof, enclosed on all three sides by more apartments.

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse hóf, reinforced in modern (post-1990, chiefly neopagan) use by Icelandic hof (shrine, temple).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hof (plural hofs)

  1. (Neopaganism): Template, sanctuary, hall.
    • 1996 for each ten churches burned to ashes, one heathen hof is avenged Varg Vikernes, cited after Gardell, Gods of the Blood, 2003, p. 307.
    • 2005 Asatruarfelagid lacks a central religious temple, or hof in Icelandic. Constructing a hof has been high on the members' wish list for many years Michael Strmiska, Modern Paganism In World Cultures: Comparative Perspectives, p. 170.
    • 2006 A Hof dedicated to the worship of the Aesir and the Vanir idhavellihof.org


Etymology 3Edit

From Korean 호프 (hopeu), in turn from German Hofbräuhaus, ultimately from Proto-Germanic *hufą (farm, building). In English, the spelling has been re-aligned with the Korean term's etymon, Hof(bräuhaus). Compare howff ("tavern").

NounEdit

hof (plural hofs)

  1. A Korean-style bar or pub.

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch hof, from Old Dutch hof, from Proto-Germanic *hufą.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hof n (plural hoven, diminutive hofje n)

  1. (royal) court
  2. court of law; short form of gerechtshof
  3. court, yard

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

hof m (plural hoven, diminutive hofje n)

  1. garden (in Flanders)

Derived termsEdit


IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse hof, from Proto-Germanic *hufą.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hof n (genitive singular hofs, nominative plural hof)

  1. temple

DeclensionEdit


Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch hof, from Proto-Germanic *hufą.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hof n, m

  1. court, enclosed space
  2. garden
  3. farmstead
  4. castle (court of the nobility)

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *hufą, from Proto-Indo-European *kewp-, a suffixed form of *kew- (bend, cove, hollow). Cognate with Old Saxon hof, Dutch hof, Old High German hof (German Hof), Old Norse hof (Swedish hov).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hof n

  1. house, dwelling, hovel
  2. court, hall, sanctuary

See alsoEdit

DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *hōfaz, from Proto-Indo-European *kōpos. Cognate with Old Saxon hof (Dutch hoef), Old High German huof (German Huf), Old Norse hófr (Danish hov, Icelandic hófur, Swedish hov), Russian копыто (kopyto) and Sanskrit शप्ह (śapha).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hōf m

  1. a hoof
DeclensionEdit
DescendantsEdit

Old NorseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *hufą (hill, house, temple). Cognate with Old English hof, Old Frisian hof, Old Saxon hof, Old Dutch hof, Old High German hof. Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *kewp- (to bend, arch, vault).

PronunciationEdit

  • (12th century Icelandic) IPA(key): /ˈhof/

NounEdit

hof n (genitive hofs, plural hof)

  1. (Heathenry) a temple, sanctuary
    • Vǫluspá, verse 7, lines 3-4, in 1860, T. Möbius, Edda Sæmundar hins fróða: mit einem Anhang zum Theil bisher ungedruckter Gedichte. Leipzig, page 2:
      [] þeir er hörg ok hof / hátimbruðu, []
      [] they who shrines and temples / high timbered, []
  2. (mostly in compounds) a hall, court
    • Hymiskviða, verse 33, lines 3-4, in 1860, T. Möbius, Edda Sæmundar hins fróða: mit einem Anhang zum Theil bisher ungedruckter Gedichte. Leipzig, page 48:
      [] út or óru / ölkjól hofi. []
      [] forth from our house / the cauldron here. []

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Faroese: hov n
  • Norwegian Bokmål: hoff n, hov n
  • Norwegian Nynorsk: hoff n, hov n
  • Icelandic: hof n
  • Swedish: hov n, hof n (Old Swedish hof n)

ReferencesEdit

  • hof in An Icelandic-English Dictionary, R. Cleasby and G. Vigfússon, Clarendon Press, 1874, at Internet Archive.
  • hof in A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, G. T. Zoëga, Clarendon Press, 1910, at Internet Archive.

Old SaxonEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *hufą, from Proto-Indo-European *kewp-, a suffixed form of *kew- (bend, cove, hollow). Cognate with Old English hof, Dutch hof, Old High German hof (German Hof), Old Norse hof (Swedish hov).

NounEdit

hof n

  1. dwelling, hovel, house
  2. court, hall

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *hōfaz, from Proto-Indo-European *kōpos. Cognate with Old English hof (Dutch hoef), Old High German huof (German Huf), Old Norse hófr (Danish hov, Icelandic hófur, Swedish hof), Russian копыто (kopyto) and Sanskrit शप्ह (śapha).

NounEdit

hōf m

  1. a hoof

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

hof n

  1. royal court; Obsolete spelling of hov.
  2. hoof; Obsolete spelling of hov.

DeclensionEdit