Last modified on 12 August 2014, at 21:52
See also: pub. and Pub.

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Short form of public, from public house

NounEdit

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Wikipedia

pub (plural pubs)

  1. A public house, where beverages, primarily alcoholic, may be bought and drunk. Many pubs also provide food and/or entertainment.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, “Foreword”, in The China Governess[1]:
      Reg liked a chat about old times and we used to go and have a chinwag in the pub.
    • 2013 June 8, “The new masters and commanders”, The Economist, volume 407, number 8839, page 52: 
      From the ground, Colombo’s port does not look like much. Those entering it are greeted by wire fences, walls dating back to colonial times and security posts. For mariners leaving the port after lonely nights on the high seas, the delights of the B52 Night Club and Stallion Pub lie a stumble away.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

pub (third-person singular simple present pubs, present participle pubbing, simple past and past participle pubbed)

  1. (intransitive) To go to one or more public houses.

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Abbreviation of publication

NounEdit

pub (plural pubs)

  1. A publication.
    registered pubs

Etymology 3Edit

Abbreviation of publish

VerbEdit

pub (third-person singular simple present pubs, present participle pubbing, simple past and past participle pubbed)

  1. (informal, transitive) to publish

FinnishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

pub

  1. pub

DeclensionEdit


FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Short form of publicité

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pub f (plural pubs)

  1. Television ad or advert.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From English pub

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pub m (plural pubs)

  1. pub

External linksEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

English

NounEdit

pub m (invariable)

  1. pub

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

English pub

NounEdit

pub c

  1. pub

DeclensionEdit