Last modified on 17 October 2014, at 19:53

house

See also: House

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English hous, hus, from Old English hūs (dwelling, shelter, house), from Proto-Germanic *hūsą (compare West Frisian hûs, Dutch huis, Low German Huus, German Haus, Danish hus), possibly from Proto-Indo-European *(s)keus-, from *(s)keu- (to hide). More at hose.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

The house of a Japanese rice farmer.

house (plural houses)

  1. Human habitation
    1. ​ A structure serving as an abode of human beings. [from 9th c.]
      • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 1, Mr. Pratt's Patients:
        Pretty soon I struck into a sort of path  [] . It twisted and turned, [] and opened out into a big clear space like a lawn. And, back of the lawn, was a big, old-fashioned house, with piazzas stretching in front of it, and all blazing with lights. 'Twas the house I'd seen the roof of from the beach.
      This is my house and my family's ancestral home.
    2. An animal's shelter or den, or the shell of an animal such as a snail, used for protection. [from 10th c.]
    3. A building used by people for something other than a main residence (typically with qualifying word). [from 10th c.]
      The former carriage house had been made over into a guest house.
    4. A public house, an inn, or the management of such. [from 10th c.]
      the House of the Rising Sun
      One more, sir, then I'll have to stop serving you – rules of the house, I'm afraid.
    5. ​ A place of public entertainment, especially (without qualifying word) a theatre; also the audience for a live theatrical or similar performance. [from 10th c.]
      • 1905, Baroness Emmuska Orczy, chapter 2, The Affair at the Novelty Theatre[1]:
        Miss Phyllis Morgan, as the hapless heroine dressed in the shabbiest of clothes, appears in the midst of a gay and giddy throng; she apostrophises all and sundry there, including the villain, and has a magnificent scene which always brings down the house, and nightly adds to her histrionic laurels.
      After her swan-song, there wasn't a dry eye in the house.
    6. A brothel. [from 10th c.]
    7. (business) A place of business; a company or organisation. [from 10th c.]
    8. (politics) The building where a deliberative assembly meets; hence, the assembly itself, forming a component of a (national or state) legislature. [from 10th c.]
      The petition was so ridiculous that the house rejected it after minimal debate.
    9. A printer's or publishing company. [from 16th c.]
      A small publishing house would have a contract with an independent fulfillment house.
    10. A place of gambling; a casino. [from 18th c.]
    11. A grouping of schoolchildren for the purposes of competition in sports and other activities. [from 19th c.]
      I was a member of Spenser house when I was at school.
  2. Extended senses
    1. (literary) Somewhere something metaphorically resides; a place of rest or repose. [from 9th c.]
      • 1598, Ben Jonson, Every Man in his Humor:
        Like a pestilence, it doth infect / The houses of the brain.
      • 1815, Walter Scott, The Lord of the Isles:
        Such hate was his, when his last breath / Renounced the peaceful house of death [] .
    2. The people who live in the same house; a household. [from 9th c.]
      • Bible, Acts x. 2
        one that feared God with all his house
    3. A dynasty, a familial descendance; a family with its ancestors and descendants, especially a royal or noble one. [from 10th c.]
      The current Queen is from the House of Windsor.
    4. (astrology) One of the twelve divisions of an astrological chart. [from 14th c.]
      • 1971, Keith Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic, Folio Society 2012, page 313:
        Since there was a limited number of planets, houses and signs of the zodiac, the astrologers tended to reduce human potentialities to a set of fixed types and to postulate only a limited number of possible variations.
    5. (chess, now rare) A square on a chessboard, regarded as the proper place of a piece. [from 16th c.]
    6. (curling) The four concentric circles where points are scored on the ice. [from 19th c.]
    7. Lotto; bingo. [from 20th c.]
    8. House music.
    9. (uncountable, US) An aggregate of characteristics of a house.
      • 1990 Feb 24, “Goin' South Affordable is trendy in these suburbs”, Chicago Tribune:
        In comparison with the western suburbs, we felt we could get a lot more house for the money.
      • 2005 Jan 16, “DOWNSIZERS LIVE IT UP - BABY BOOMERS WANT SMALLER HOMES WITH LOTS OF...”, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette:
        There's just a huge number of people who are close to retirement and feel they have too much house on too much property.
      • 2007 Nov 6, “When Will the Slump End?”, Newsweek:
        Those homeowners who bought too much house, or borrowed against inflated values are now going to be liable for their own poor decisions
    10. (Discuss(+) this sense) (uncountable) A children's game in which the players pretend to be members of a household.
      As the babysitter, Emma always acted as the mother whenever the kids demanded to play house.

SynonymsEdit

  • (establishment): shop
  • (company or organisation): shop

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

External linksEdit

VerbEdit

house (third-person singular simple present houses, present participle housing, simple past and past participle housed)

  1. (transitive) To keep within a structure or container.
    The car is housed in the garage.
    • Evelyn
      House your choicest carnations, or rather set them under a penthouse.
  2. (transitive) To admit to residence; to harbor/harbour.
    • Sir Philip Sidney
      Palladius wished him to house all the Helots.
  3. To take shelter or lodging; to abide; to lodge.
    • Shakespeare
      You shall not house with me.
  4. (transitive, astrology) To dwell within one of the twelve astrological houses.
    • Dryden
      Where Saturn houses.
  5. (transitive) To contain or cover mechanical parts.
  6. (obsolete) To drive to a shelter.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
  7. (obsolete) To deposit and cover, as in the grave.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Sandys to this entry?)
  8. (nautical) To stow in a safe place; to take down and make safe.
    to house the upper spars

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

StatisticsEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

house n

  1. gosling

DeclensionEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

house m (uncountable)

  1. house music, house

FinnishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • Hyphenation: hou‧se
  • IPA(key): /ˈhouse(ʔ)/

NounEdit

house (uncountable)

  1. (music) house music, house

DeclensionEdit


FrenchEdit

NounEdit

house f (uncountable)

  1. house music, house (genre of music)

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From English house, house music

NounEdit

house m (indeclinable) (uncountable)

  1. house music, house

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

NounEdit

house m

  1. house music, house

PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

English house music

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

house m

  1. house, house music
DeclensionEdit

PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

house m

  1. house music, house

SynonymsEdit


SpanishEdit

NounEdit

house m (uncountable)

  1. house music, house

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

house c

  1. house music, house

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit