Last modified on 9 November 2014, at 22:35

ignoramus

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

After the ignorant lawyer Ignoramus, the titular character in the 1615 play Ignoramus by the English playwright Georges Ruggle; from Latin ignōrāmus (we do not know, we are ignorant of), the first-person plural present active indicative of īgnōrō (I do not know, I am unacquainted with, I am ignorant of).

NounEdit

ignoramus (plural ignoramuses or ignorami)

  1. A totally ignorant person—unknowledgeable, uneducated, or uninformed; a fool.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Directly from Latin ignōrāmus (we do not know).

NounEdit

ignoramus (plural ignoramuses)

  1. (law, dated) A grand jury's ruling on an indictment when the evidence is determined to be insufficient to send the case to trial.

LatinEdit

VerbEdit

īgnōrāmus

  1. first-person plural present active indicative of īgnōrō
    ignoramus et ignorabimus
    We do not know and will not know