Last modified on 9 May 2014, at 14:16

impersonal

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French impersonnel, from Latin impersonalis, from Latin im- (not) + personalis (personal).

AdjectiveEdit

impersonal (comparative more impersonal, superlative most impersonal)

  1. Not personal; not representing a person; not having personality.
    An almighty but impersonal power, called Fate. –Sir J. Stephen.
  2. Lacking warmth or emotion; cold.
    She sounded impersonal as she gave her report of the Nazi death camps.
  3. (grammar, of a verb or other word) Not having a subject, or having a third person pronoun without an antecedent.
    The verb “rain” is impersonal in sentences like “It’s raining.”

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Old FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

impersonal m (feminine impersonale or impersonal)

  1. (grammar) impersonal