Last modified on 9 July 2014, at 05:23

innate

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin innātus (inborn), perfect active participle of innāscor (be born in, grow up in), from in (in, at on) + nāscor (be born); see natal, native.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

innate (not comparable)

  1. Inborn; native; natural; as, innate vigor; innate eloquence.
  2. Originating in, or derived from, the constitution of the intellect, as opposed to acquired from experience; as, innate ideas. See a priori, intuitive.
    • South
      There is an innate light in every man, discovering to him the first lines of duty in the common notions of good and evil.
    • John Locke
      how men [] may attain to all the knowledge they have, without the help of any innate impressions
  3. (botany) Joined by the base to the very tip of a filament; as, an innate anther.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Gray to this entry?)

Usage notesEdit

  • Nouns often used with "innate": knowledge, idea, immunity, etc.

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Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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VerbEdit

innate (third-person singular simple present innates, present participle innating, simple past and past participle innated)

  1. To cause to exist; to call into being.

TranslationsEdit

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ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

innate f pl

  1. feminine plural of innato

LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

innāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of innātus