Last modified on 7 December 2014, at 21:57

a priori

EnglishEdit

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 A priori on Wikipedia

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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

First attested in 1710, from Latin a priori (former), literally from the former.

AdjectiveEdit

a priori (comparative more a priori, superlative most a priori)

  1. (logic) Based on hypothesis rather than experiment.
    In his opening argument, the student mentioned nothing beyond his a priori knowledge.
  2. Self-evident, intuitively obvious
  3. Presumed without analysis
    • 1996, Jeet Heer, Gravitas, Autumn 1996
      While the great critics drew their authority from the breadth of their reading, New Criterion critics often base their authority on an a priori rejection of the contemporary.
  4. (linguistics, of a constructed language) Developed entirely from scratch, without deriving it from existing languages.[1]

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdverbEdit

a priori (comparative more a priori, superlative most a priori)

  1. (logic) In a way based on theoretical deduction rather than empirical observation

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Donald J. Harlow, How to Build a Language

FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

a priori

  1. intuitively known, a priori

External linksEdit


GermanEdit

AdjectiveEdit

a priori (not comparable)

  1. a priori

DeclensionEdit

AdverbEdit

a priori

  1. a priori

External linksEdit


ItalianEdit

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia it

AdjectiveEdit

a priori (invariable)

  1. a priori

AdverbEdit

a priori

  1. a priori

AntonymsEdit


PortugueseEdit

AdverbEdit

a priori (comparative mais a priori superlative o mais a priori)

  1. (logic) a priori (derived by logic)

SpanishEdit

Spanish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia es

AdverbEdit

a priori

  1. beforehand
  2. (logic) a priori