intercede

See also: intercedé

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

[circa 1570] From Middle French intercéder, from Latin intercēdō,[1] from inter- (between) + cēdō (I go) (English cede), literally “to (act as) go-between”.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

intercede (third-person singular simple present intercedes, present participle interceding, simple past and past participle interceded)

  1. (intransitive) To plead on someone else's behalf.
  2. (intransitive) To act as a mediator in a dispute; to arbitrate or mediate.
    • Milton
      I to the lords will intercede, not doubting their favourable ear.
  3. To pass between; to intervene.
    • Sir M. Hale
      He supposed that a vast period interceded between that origination and the age wherein he lived.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ intercede” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

intercede

  1. third-person singular present indicative of intercedere

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

intercēde

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of intercēdō



SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

intercede

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of interceder.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of interceder.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of interceder.
Last modified on 1 April 2014, at 22:06