Last modified on 24 May 2014, at 21:39

involution

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin involutio, from volvere ‘to roll’.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

involution (plural involutions)

  1. entanglement; a spiralling inwards; intricacy
    • 1968: ‘Gomez,’ said the mortician, ‘is an expert only on the involutions of his own rectum.’ — Anthony Burgess, Enderby Outside
  2. (mathematics) An endofunction whose square is equal to the identity function; a function equal to its inverse.
    • 1996, Alfred J. Menezes et al, Handbook of Applied Cryptography, CRC Press, page 10:
      Involutions have the property that they are their own inverses.
  3. (physiology) The regressive changes in the body occurring with old age.
  4. (mathematics, obsolete) A power: the result of raising one number to the power of another.

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

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