EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English *lusk, from Old Norse lǫskr (weak, idle), from Proto-Germanic *laskwaz, *latskwaz (sluggish, dull, lazy), from Proto-Indo-European *lēid- (to let, subside). Cognate with Middle Dutch lasch (flabby, loose), Middle Low German lasch, las (tired, dull). See lash.

AdjectiveEdit

lusk (comparative more lusk, superlative most lusk)

  1. lazy or slothful

NounEdit

lusk (plural lusks)

  1. a lazy or slothful person
    (Can we find and add a quotation of T. Kendall to this entry?)

VerbEdit

lusk (third-person singular simple present lusks, present participle lusking, simple past and past participle lusked)

  1. (obsolete) To be idle or unemployed.

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

NounEdit

lusk m

  1. pod (of a leguminous plant)
Last modified on 18 September 2013, at 14:36