mésalliance

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French mésalliance, from mésallier (to misally).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mésalliance (plural mésalliances)

  1. Marriage with a person of inferior social position.
    • Aylmer and Louise Maude translation of Leo Tolstoy, War and Peace:
      But if you marry the old count you will make his last days happy, and as widow of the Grand...the prince would no longer be making a mésalliance by marrying you.
    • 1871–72, George Eliot, Middlemarch, Chapter 37
      It was an abominable thing that my grandmother should have been disinherited because she made what they called a mésalliance, though there was nothing to be said against her husband except that he was a Polish refugee who gave lessons for his bread.
    • William Makepeace Thackeray:
      In England, a grocer's daughter would think she made a mésalliance by marrying a painter!
    • Mohun Dampier, "Beyond the Walls", Ambrose Bierce:
      To a mésalliance of that kind every globule of my ancestral blood spoke in opposition.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From mésalli(er) +‎ -ance.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mésalliance f (plural mésalliances)

  1. misalliance, mésalliance
Last modified on 23 November 2013, at 07:34