Last modified on 1 July 2014, at 11:52

social

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Middle French social, from Latin sociālis (of or belonging to a companion or companionship or association, social), from socius (a companion, fellow, partner, associate, ally), from sequor (follow).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

social (plural socials)

  1. A festive gathering to foster introductions.
    They organized a social at the dance club to get people to know each other.
  2. (Canadian Prairies) A dance held to raise money for a couple to be married.
  3. (UK, colloquial) Abbreviation of social security benefit., the UK government department responsible for administering such welfare benefit, for its employees.
    Fred hated going down to the social to sign on.
  4. (US, colloquial) Abbreviation of social security number.
    What's your social?
  5. (dated, Ireland) A dinner dance event, usually held annually by a company or sporting club.

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

social (comparative more social, superlative most social)

  1. Being extroverted or outgoing.
    James is a very social guy; he knows lots of people.
  2. Of or relating to society.
    • 2012 January 1, Donald Worster, “A Drier and Hotter Future”, American Scientist, volume 100, number 1, page 70: 
      Phoenix and Lubbock are both caught in severe drought, and it is going to get much worse. We may see many such [dust] storms in the decades ahead, along with species extinctions, radical disturbance of ecosystems, and intensified social conflict over land and water. Welcome to the Anthropocene, the epoch when humans have become a major geological and climatic force.
    Teresa feels uncomfortable in certain social situations.
    Unemployment is a social problem.
  3. (Internet) Relating to social media or social networks.
    social gaming
  4. (rare) Relating to a nation's allies (compare the Social War)
  5. (botany, zoology) Cooperating or growing in groups.
    a social insect

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TranslationsEdit

StatisticsEdit

External linksEdit


AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sociālis.

AdjectiveEdit

social (epicene, plural sociales)

  1. social

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sociālis.

AdjectiveEdit

social m, f (masculine and feminine plural socials)

  1. social

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sociālis (of or belonging to a companion, companionship or association, social), from socius (a companion, ally).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

social m (feminine sociale, masculine plural sociaux, feminine plural sociales)

  1. social, related to society, community
    Un devoir social.
    A social obligation.
  2. social, living in society
    l'homme est un animal social.
    Man is a social animal.
  3. mundane, related to social life
    Était-ce parce que la vie sociale de Gilberte devait présenter les mêmes contrastes que celle de Swann ? (Marcel Proust, Fugitive, 1922)

SynonymsEdit

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NounEdit

social m (plural socials)

  1. action intended to make society work better
    faire du social.

External linksEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sociālis.

AdjectiveEdit

social m, f (plural sociais)

  1. social

Derived termsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sociālis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

social m, f (plural sociais; comparable)

  1. social

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sociālis (of or belonging to a companion, companionship or association, social), from socius (a companion, ally).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

social m, f (plural sociales)

  1. social

Derived termsEdit


SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

social

  1. (not comparable) social, pertaining to living conditions and society (of an issue)
  2. social, kind, friendly, welcoming (of a person)

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit