Last modified on 16 December 2014, at 16:22

malleable

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English malliable, borrowed from Late Latin malleābilis, derived from malleāre (to hammer), from malleus (hammer), from Proto-Indo-European *mal-ni- (crushing), an extended variant of Proto-Indo-European *melH₂- (crush, grind).

PronunciationEdit

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈmæliəbəl/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: mal‧le‧a‧ble

AdjectiveEdit

malleable (comparative more malleable, superlative most malleable)

  1. Able to be hammered into thin sheets; capable of being extended or shaped by beating with a hammer, or by the pressure of rollers.
  2. (metaphorical) Flexible, liable to change.
    My opinion on the subject is malleable.
  3. (cryptography, of an algorithm) in which an adversary can alter a ciphertext such that it decrypts to a related plaintext

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