Last modified on 28 May 2014, at 13:15

Old IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *onkus-tus, from Proto-Celtic *onkus (near).

AdjectiveEdit

ocus (u-stem, comparative oicsiu, superlative oicsi)

  1. near
    • c. 845, St. Gall Glosses on Priscian, Sg. 138a2, 3
      écndairc cian ... ecṅdairc ocus
      (gl. personae absenti vel quasi absenti; lit. "absent near", i.e. though present regarded as absent)
  2. close (of a relationship)
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, Wb. 9c32
      is acus a coibdelag
      near is their kinship
    • The Martyrology of Óengus the Culdee
      is ocus ar cundu
      close is our friendship

Usage notesEdit

Often followed by preposition do.

DescendantsEdit

ConjunctionEdit

ocus

  1. and

DescendantsEdit

SynonymsEdit

NounEdit

ocus m (u-stem, plural oicsi, genitive oicse)

  1. nearness, proximity
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, Wb. 23b41
      imb i céin fa i n-accus beo-sa
      whether I be far or near

ReferencesEdit

  • Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, Dublin [1]