prestige

See also: Prestige

EnglishEdit

Wikipedia

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French prestige (illusion, fascination, enchantment, prestige)

, from Latin praestigium (a delusion, an illusion)
, from praestinguere (to obscure, extinguish)
, from prae (before) + stinguere (to extinguish); or
, from praestringere (to blind; to blindfold; to dazzle or confuse someone)
, from prae (before) + stringere (to press, tighten, compress).
  • Note: despite the phonetic similarities and prestige's old meaning of "delusion, illusion, trick", the word has a different root than prestidigitator and prestidigitation.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /prɛˈstiːʒ/, /prɛˈstidʒ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːʒ, -iːdʒ

NounEdit

prestige (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete) Delusion; illusion; trick.
  2. The quality of how good the reputation of something or someone is, how favourably something or someone is regarded.
    Oxford has a university of very high prestige.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

External linksEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

prestige m (plural prestiges)

  1. prestige
    de prestige - prestigious

Derived termsEdit


SwedishEdit

NounEdit

prestige c

  1. prestige

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

  • prestigelös
Last modified on 29 March 2014, at 19:38