Last modified on 17 December 2014, at 01:47

prink

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English prinken (to wink, signal with the eye), from prinke, prinche (a wink, twinkling of the eye, momentary gesture), from Old English princ (a wink). More at pry.

VerbEdit

prink (third-person singular simple present prinks, present participle prinking, simple past and past participle prinked)

  1. (obsolete or dialectal) to give a wink; to wink.

Etymology 2Edit

Perhaps alteration (due to primp) of prank (to deck, adorn), from Middle English pranken (to trim), or from Middle Dutch prinken (to deck for show, parade in fine apparel). Cognate with Dutch pronken (to flaunt), German Prunk (a show, parade, splendour), Danish and Swedish prunk.

NounEdit

prink (plural prinks)

  1. the act of adjusting dress or appearance; a sprucing up
    • 2006, Louisa May Alcott, Little Women:
      [...] And does my hair look very bad?", said Meg, as she turned from the glass in Mrs. Gardiner's dressing room after a prolonged prink.

VerbEdit

prink (third-person singular simple present prinks, present participle prinking, simple past and past participle prinked)

  1. to look, gaze
  2. to dress finely, primp, preen, spruce up
  3. to strut, put on pompous airs, be pretentious
SynonymsEdit