slang

See also: Slang

EnglishEdit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

1756, origin unknown.

NounEdit

slang (countable and uncountable, plural slangs)

  1. Language outside of conventional usage.
  2. Language that is unique to a particular profession or subject; jargon.
  3. The specialized language of a social group, sometimes used to make what is said unintelligible to those not members of the group; cant.
    • 1871–72, George Eliot, Middlemarch, Chapter 11
      "Oh, there are so many superior teas and sugars now. Superior is getting to be shopkeepers' slang."
      "Are you beginning to dislike slang, then?" said Rosamond, with mild gravity.
      "Only the wrong sort. All choice of words is slang. It marks a class."
      "There is correct English: that is not slang."
      "I beg your pardon: correct English is the slang of prigs who write history and essays. And the strongest slang of all is the slang of poets."
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit
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VerbEdit

slang (third-person singular simple present slangs, present participle slanging, simple past and past participle slanged)

  1. (transitive, dated) To vocally abuse, or shout at.
    • 1888, Also, he had to keep his temper when he was slanged in the theatre porch by a policeman — Rudyard Kipling, ‘Miss Youghal's Sais’, Plain Tales from the Hills (Folio Society 2007, p. 26)
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

slang

  1. (archaic) simple past tense of sling
    • 1836, Edward Bagnall, Saul and David
      Before he slang the all-deciding stone []

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

slang (plural slangs)

  1. (UK, dialect) Any long, narrow piece of land; a promontory.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Holland to this entry?)

Etymology 4Edit

Compare sling.

NounEdit

slang (plural slangs)

  1. (UK, obsolete) A fetter worn on the leg by a convict.

External linksEdit

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch slang (snake, serpent), from Middle Dutch slange (snake, serpent), from Old Dutch slango (snake, serpent), from Proto-Germanic *slangô (snake, serpent).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

slang (plural slange)

  1. snake; serpent
    • 1983, E. P. Groenewald et al. (translators), Bybel, Genesis 3:2:
      Die vrou het die slang geantwoord: “Ons mag eet van die vrugte van die bome in die tuin.
      The woman answered the serpent: “We may eat of the fruit of the trees in the garden.

Related termsEdit

  • grootslang

CzechEdit

Czech Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia cs

NounEdit

slang m

  1. slang

DutchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch slange, from Old Dutch slango, from Proto-Germanic *slangô (snake, serpent).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

slang f (plural slangen, diminutive slangetje n)

  1. snake
  2. hose (flexible tube)
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From English slang.

NounEdit

slang n (plural slangs, diminutive slangetje n)

  1. language specific to one social group, slang

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English slang

NounEdit

slang m (plural slangs)

  1. English slang
    Twain fut un des premiers auteurs provenant des terres intérieures des États-Unis qui a su capturer la distinction, le slang comique et l'iconoclasme de sa nation.

See alsoEdit


LimburgishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Dutch.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

slang f

  1. hose (flexible tube)

Etymology 2Edit

From English.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

slang f

  1. slang

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

English slang

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

slang n (plural slanguri)

  1. slang

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

  • argou

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

slang c

  1. hose, tube, flexible pipe
  2. (uncountable) slang (language)

DeclensionEdit


TagalogEdit

NounEdit

slang

  1. (colloquial, informal) A thick foreign accent in English.
    Ayos ka mag-Ingles a, parang Kano, slang na slang!
    That´s some English diction you have, like an American, with their accent!
Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 22:42