Last modified on 9 July 2014, at 07:04

recollection

See also: re-collection

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Via French récollection or the verb recollect, both from Latin recollectus, the past participle of recolligere (to collect again), itself from re- + colligere (to gather).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

recollection (usually uncountable, plural recollections)

  1. The act of recollecting, or recalling to the memory; the operation by which objects are recalled to the memory, or ideas revived in the mind; reminiscence; remembrance.
  2. The power of recalling ideas to the mind, or the period within which things can be recollected; remembrance
    Alas that distant event isn't within my recollection anymore.
  3. That which is recollected; something called to mind; a reminiscence.
    One of his earliest recollections." - Thomas Babington Macaulay.
  4. (archaic) (also spelled re-collection) The act or practice of collecting or concentrating the mind; concentration; self-control.
    From such an education Charles contracted habits of gravity and recollection.
SynonymsEdit
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Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
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Etymology 2Edit

re- +‎ collection

PronunciationEdit

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NounEdit

recollection (countable and uncountable, plural recollections)

  1. Process of collecting again.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.