Last modified on 7 July 2014, at 12:08

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French re- in some cases, directly from Latin re- in others. Displaced native English ed-, eft-, gain-, with-/wither-.

PronunciationEdit

PrefixEdit

re-

  1. again, anew
  2. backward

Usage notesEdit

  • The hyphen is not normally included in words formed using this prefix, except when the absence of a hyphen would make the meaning unclear. Hyphens are used in the following cases:
    • Sometimes in new coinages and nonce words.
      stir and re-stir the mixture
    • When the word that the prefix is combined with begins with a capital letter.
      re-Christianise
    • In British usage, when the word that the prefix is combined with begins with e.
      re-entry (North American: reentry)
    • When the word formed is identical in form to another word in which re- does not have any of the senses listed above.
      The chairs have been re-covered (covered again)
      The chairs have been recovered (obtained back)
  • A dieresis may be used instead of a hyphen, as in reëntry. This usage is now rare, but extant; see dieresis: orthography for examples and discussion.
  • re- is highly productive, to the point of being almost grammaticalized — almost any verb can have re- applied, especially in colloquial speech. Notable exceptions to this include all forms of be and the modal verbs can, should, etc.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

See alsoEdit


EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin re-.

PrefixEdit

re-

  1. indicates repetition, again
  2. indicates a return to previous state, back

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

PrefixEdit

re-

  1. re-

Usage notesEdit

This is only used when the stem starts with a consonant; otherwise, ré- or r- are used.

See alsoEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

(borrowed). The prefix re- is borrowed from Latin, while the variant ri- is inherited from Latin.[1]

PrefixEdit

re-

  1. re-

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ 1950, Bruno Migliorini; Aldo Duro, Prontuario etimologico della lingua italiana (in Italian), Paravia:

JèrriaisEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French re-, from Latin re-.

PrefixEdit

re-

  1. re-

Derived termsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

The Latin prefix rĕ- has a parallel in Umbrian re-, but its further etymology is unknown (OED). While it carries a general sense of "back" or "backwards", its precise sense is not always clear, and its great productivity in classical Latin has the tendency to obscure its original meaning.

PrefixEdit

re-

  1. again; prefix added to various words to indicate an action being done again, or like the other usages indicated above under English.

Usage notesEdit

The prefix anciently also occurs in the form red-, where the -d- is a remnant of the ancient characteristic of the ablative, e.g. in red-do, and with a compositional -i- in redi-vivus. This feature is shared with the preposition se- (originally identical with the conjunction sed), and also in prod-, antid-, postid- (see Lewis & Short, A Latin Dictionary, 1897, s.v. "re" and "D").

The -d- is found before vowels and h, but in later Latin is dropped, as in e.g. reaedifico, reinvito. Assimilation of the d before consonants produced the forms relligio, relliquiae, reccido; and the suppression of the d may account for the frequent lengthening of the e by poets in rēduco, rēlatum.

DescendantsEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

PrefixEdit

re-

  1. re- (again; once more)

OccitanEdit

PrefixEdit

re-

  1. re-

Old FrenchEdit

PrefixEdit

re-

  1. re- (again; once more)

PortugueseEdit

PrefixEdit

re-

  1. re- (again)

SpanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin re-

PrefixEdit

re-

  1. again
  2. backwards

Etymology 2Edit

Of Celtic origin, cognate with Irish ro (very)

PrefixEdit

re-

  1. Intensification, very.
    Can be used with adjectives to form a superlative e.g.:
    rebueno = buenísimo, rechulo = chulísimo
SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit


SwedishEdit

PrefixEdit

re-

  1. re-; doing something again

Derived termsEdit

SynonymsEdit