Last modified on 8 December 2014, at 03:11

satellite

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Middle French satellite, from Latin satelles (attendant). Ultimately perhaps of Etruscan origin.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

satellite (plural satellites)

  1. A moon or other smaller body orbiting a larger one. [from 17th c.]
    The Moon is a natural satellite of the Earth.
    A spent upper stage is a derelict satellite.
  2. A man-made apparatus designed to be placed in orbit around a celestial body, generally to relay information, data etc. to Earth. [from 20th c.]
    Many telecommunication satellites orbit at 36000km above the equator.
  3. A country, state, office, building etc. which is under the jurisdiction, influence, or domination of another body. [from 19th c.]
  4. (now rare) An attendant on an important person; a member of someone's retinue, often in a somewhat derogatory sense; a henchman. [from 16th c.]
    • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.3:
      We read in the Bible, that Nicanor the persecutor of Gods Law [] sent his Satellites to apprehend the good old man Rasias [].
    • 1826, Walter Scott, Woodstock, p.348:
      [] he would nevertheless have a better bargain of this tall satellite if they settled the debate betwixt them in the forest []. Betwixt anxiety, therefore, vexation, and anger, Charles faced suddenly round on his pursuer [].
    • 1948, Willard E. Hawkins, The Technique of Fiction: A Basic Course in Story Writing, p.169:
      The unnamed chronicler in his Dupin stories was the first Dr. Watson type of satellite—a narrator who accompanies the detective on his exploits, exclaims over his brilliance [].
  5. (colloquial, uncountable) Satellite TV; reception of television broadcasts via services that utilize man-made satellite technology. [from 20th c.]
    Do you have satellite at your house?

Derived termsEdit

Usage notesEdit

The man-made telecommunication objects are sometimes called artificial satellites to distinguish them from natural satellites such as the Moon.

TranslationsEdit

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See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin satellitem (accusative singular of satelles).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

satellite m (plural satellites)

  1. satellite

Related termsEdit

External linksEdit


ItalianEdit

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia it

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

satellite m (plural satelliti)

  1. satellite

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


JèrriaisEdit

EtymologyEdit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

NounEdit

satellite f (plural satellites)

  1. satellite

Derived termsEdit


LatinEdit

NounEdit

satellite

  1. ablative singular of satelles

Middle FrenchEdit

EymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin satellitem, accusative singular of satelles.

NounEdit

satellite m (plural satellites)

  1. (military, Antiquity) a guard or watchman

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit