saturate

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin saturatus, perfect passive participle of saturare (to fill full), from satur (full).

VerbEdit

saturate (third-person singular simple present saturates, present participle saturating, simple past and past participle saturated)

  1. To cause to become completely penetrated, impregnated, or soaked (especially with a liquid).
    • 1815, in the Annals of Philosophy, volume 6, page 332:
      Suppose, on the contrary, that a piece of charcoal saturated with hydrogen gas is put into a receiver filled with carbonic acid gas, []
    • Macaulay
      Innumerable flocks and herbs covered that vast expanse of emerald meadow saturated with the moisture of the Atlantic.
    Rain saturated their clothes.
    After walking home in the driving rain, his clothes were saturated.
  2. To satisfy the affinity of; to cause a substance to become inert by chemical combination with all that it can hold.
    One can saturate phosphorus with chlorine.

TranslationsEdit

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ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

saturate

  1. second-person plural present indicative of saturare
  2. second-person plural imperative of saturare
  3. feminine plural of saturato

LatinEdit

VerbEdit

saturāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of saturō
Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 19:47