Last modified on 15 December 2014, at 20:04

scuttle

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈskʌtəl/, [ˈskʌtɫ̩], [ˈskʌtəɫ]
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈskʌtəl/, [ˈskʌɾɫ̩], [ˈskʌɾəɫ]
  • Rhymes: -ʌtəl

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English scutel (dish, platter), from Latin scutella, diminutive form of Latin scutra (flat tray, dish), perhaps related to Latin scutum (shield); compare Dutch schotel and German Schüssel.

NounEdit

scuttle (plural scuttles)

  1. A container like an open bucket (usually to hold and carry coal).
  2. (construction) A hatch that provides access to the roof from the interior of a building.
  3. A broad, shallow basket.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle French ( > French écoutille), from Old Norse skaut (corner of a cloth, of a sail)[1], akin to Gothic 𐍃𐌺𐌰𐌿𐍄𐍃 (skauts, projecting edge, fringe), German Schoß[2].

NounEdit

scuttle (plural scuttles)

  1. A small hatch or opening in a boat. Also, small opening in a boat or ship for draining water from open deck.
    • 1928, Lawrence R. Bourne, chapter 7, Well Tackled![1]:
      The detective kept them in view. He made his way casually along the inside of the shelter until he reached an open scuttle close to where the two men were standing talking. Eavesdropping was not a thing Larard would have practised from choice, but there were times when, in the public interest, he had to do it, and this was one of them.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

scuttle (third-person singular simple present scuttles, present participle scuttling, simple past and past participle scuttled)

  1. (transitive, nautical) To cut a hole or holes through the bottom, deck, or sides of (as of a ship), for any purpose.
  2. (transitive) To deliberately sink one's ship or boat by any means, usually by order of the vessel's commander or owner.
    • 2002, Richard Côté, Theodosia Burr Alston: Portrait of a Prodigy, Corinthian Books (2002), ISBN 9781929175314, page 325:
      In this version, the Patriot was boarded by pirates (or the crew and passengers were overpowered by mutineers), who murdered everyone and then looted and scuttled the ship.
    • 2003, Richard Norton Smith, The Colonel: The Life and Legend of Robert R. McCormick, 1880-1955, Northwestern University Press (2003), ISBN 0810120399, page 238:
      To lay the foundation for an all-weather dock at Shelter Bay, he filled an old barge with worn-out grindstones from the Thorold paper mill, then scuttled the vessel.
    • 2007, Michael Mueller, Canaris: The Life and Death of Hitler's Spymaster, Naval Institute Press (2007), ISBN 9781591141013, page 17:
      He decided that before scuttling the ship to prevent her falling into enemy hands he had to get the dead and wounded ashore.
    • 2009, Nancy Toppino, Insiders' Guide to the Florida Keys and Key West, Insiders' Guide (2009), ISBN 9780762748716, page 227:
      In recent years, steel-hull vessels up to 350 feet long have been scuttled in stable sandy-bottom areas, amassing new communities of fish and invertebrates and easing the stress and strain on the coral reef by creating new fishing and diving sites.
  3. (transitive, by extension, in figurative use) Undermine or thwart oneself (sometimes intentionally), or denigrate or destroy one's position or property; compare scupper.
    The candidate had scuttled his chances with his unhinged outburst.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

See scuddle.

VerbEdit

scuttle (third-person singular simple present scuttles, present participle scuttling, simple past and past participle scuttled)

  1. (intransitive) To move hastily, to scurry
    • Sir Walter Scott
      With the first dawn of day, old Janet was scuttling about the house to wake the baron.
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet Chapter 3
      there was a wisp or two of fine seaweed that had somehow got in, and a small crab was still alive and scuttled across the corner, yet the coffins were but little disturbed.
    • 1913, D.H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, chapter 8
      Morel scuttled out of the house before his wife came down.
Usage notesEdit

The word "scuttle" carries a crab-like connotation, and is mainly used to describe panic-like movements of the legs, akin to crabs' leg movements.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

scuttle (plural scuttles)

  1. A quick pace; a short run.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spectator to this entry?)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Le Robert pour tous, Dictionnaire de la langue française, Janvier 2004, p. 360, écoutille
  2. ^ scuttle in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913

AnagramsEdit