Last modified on 2 April 2015, at 03:59

segue

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Italian seguire (to follow) from Latin sequor; originally a musical term.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

segue (third-person singular simple present segues, present participle segueing, simple past and past participle segued)

  1. To move smoothly from one state or subject to another.
    I can tell she’s going to segue from our conversation about school to the topic of marriage.
  2. (music) To make a smooth transition from one theme to another.
    Beethoven’s symphonies effortlessly segue from one theme to the next.
  3. (of a disk jockey) To play a sequence of records with no talk between them.

Usage notesEdit

In sense “move from one subject to another”, contrast with non sequitur (abrupt transition), which is etymologically opposite (“follow” vs. “does not follow”). However, segue has connotations of moving between distinct subjects, and thus to segue often means to change rather abruptly, with at best a pretense of smooth transition.

TranslationsEdit

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NounEdit

segue (plural segues)

  1. An instance of segueing, a transition.

TranslationsEdit

Related termsEdit


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

segue

  1. third-person singular indicative present of seguire

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

segue

  1. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present indicative of seguir
  2. second-person singular (tu) affirmative imperative of seguir
  3. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of segar
  4. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of segar
  5. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of segar
  6. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of segar