sinciput

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Latin sinciput (half a head”; “smoked hog’s cheek or half-jowl”; (transferred senses): “brain”, “head), whence the French sinciput.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sinciput (plural sincipita or sinciputs)

  1. (chiefly anatomy) The front part of the head or skull (as distinct from the occiput).
    • 1964, International Abstracts of Surgery, Volume 119, page 629,
      The cranial anomalies occurred either in the occiput or the sinciput, approximately twice as often in the occiput as in the sinciput.
      Such lesions have been considered to be inoperable when they involved the sinciput.
    • 1997, Robert K. Creasy, Management of Labor and Delivery, page 375,
      Between these two extremes lie the sinciput presentation and the brow presentation. Thus there are four distinct attitudes: vertex, sinciput, brow, and face (Figure 15-7).
    • 2003, Sara Wickham, Midwifery: Best Practice, Volume 1, page 79,
      I learnt to develop a ‘feel’ for the sinciput and the occiput as these landmarks feel different abdominally, and also their ‘whereabouts’ in relationship to the pelvic brim. Therefore, when descent and flexion were taking place, I learnt to ascertain how the positions of the sinciput and occiput would change in relationship to each other and in relationship to the pelvic brim.

SynonymsEdit

  • (front part of the head or skull): bregma

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Sinciput” listed on page 73 of volume IX, part I (Si–St) of A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles [1st ed., 1919]
      Sinciput (si·nsipɒt). Chiefly Anat. Also 7 synciput. [L. sinciput, for early *senciput, f. sēmi half + caput head. So F. sinciput (1586).] The front part of the head or skull. [¶] 1578 Banister Hist. Man 8 The fore part [of the head], called Sinciput, or Bregma. 1650 Bulwer Anthropomet. 11 When the Temples are eminent, the occiput and synciput depressed. 1689 Moyle Abstr. Sea Chirurg. ii. vii, Mind that you apply not your Traphine on the temporal Bones, Sutures, or Sinciput. 1711 Addison Spectator No. 275 ¶ 5 We observed a large Antrum or Cavity in the Sinciput. 1767 Gooch Treat. Wounds I. 279 A girl, who..was struck with the hand upon the sinciput, and became immediately blind. 1809 Byron Bards & Rev. Argt., Wks. 1898 I. 305 Incorporation of the bullets with his sinciput and occiput. a1848 Holmes Nux Postcœnatica 46 All the longest heads That ever knocked their sinciputs in stretching on their beds. 1873 Mivart Elem. Anat. iii. 77 We have the base or basilar region, and opposite to it the vertex, sinciput, or sincipital region. [¶] fig.c1638 Strafford Papers II. 158, I..judge the other [to be]..the very sinciput, the vertical point of the whole faction.
  • sinciput” listed in the Oxford English Dictionary [2nd ed., 1989]

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Latin sinciput (half a head”; “smoked hog’s cheek or half-jowl”; (transferred senses): “brain”, “head), whence the English sinciput.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sinciput m

  1. (anatomy) sinciput

See alsoEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

sēmi (half) +‎ caput (head); cf. Ancient Greek ἡμικεφάλιον (hēmikephalion), ἡμίκρανον (hēmikranon), ἡμικέφαλον (hēmikephalon)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sinciput n (genitive sinciptis); third declension

  1. half a head
  2. a cheek or half the jowl of a smoked hog
  3. (transferred senses):
    1. the brain
    2. (loosely) the head

InflectionEdit

Third declension neuter.

Number Singular Plural
nominative sinciput sincipita
genitive sincipitis sincipitum
dative sincipitī sincipitibus
accusative sinciput sincipita
ablative sincipite sincipitibus
vocative sinciput sincipita

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • sinciput in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879
Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 19:36