Last modified on 25 June 2014, at 04:41

spile

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch or Middle Low German spile (splinter, peg), ultimately from Proto-Germanic *spīlaz (splinter, peg), from Proto-Indo-European *spēy- (prickle, pointed stick). Cognate with Eastern Frisian spyl, German Speil (chip, splinter, gore, wedge), Danish spile.

NounEdit

spile (plural spiles)

  1. (obsolete or dialectal) A splinter.
  2. A spigot or plug used to stop the hole in a barrel or cask.
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet Chapter 4
      So I felt my way down the passage back to the vault, and recked not of the darkness, nor of Blackbeard and his crew, if only I could lay my lips to liquor. Thus I groped about the barrels till near the top of the stack my hand struck on the spile of a keg, and drawing it, I got my mouth to the hold.
  3. (US) A spout inserted in a maple (or other tree) to draw off sap.

VerbEdit

spile (third-person singular simple present spiles, present participle spiling, simple past and past participle spiled)

  1. To plug (a hole) with a spile.
  2. To draw off (a liquid) using a spile.
  3. To provide (a barrel, tree etc.) with a spile.

Etymology 2Edit

Alteration of pile, after Etymology 1, above.

NounEdit

spile (plural spiles)

  1. A pile; a post or girder.

VerbEdit

spile (third-person singular simple present spiles, present participle spiling, simple past and past participle spiled)

  1. To support by means of spiles.

Etymology 3Edit

Alteration of spoil.

VerbEdit

spile (third-person singular simple present spiles, present participle spiling, simple past and past participle spiled)

  1. (US, dialect, transitive, intransitive) spoil.

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

VerbEdit

spile (imperative spil, infinitive at spile, present tense spiler, past tense spilede, past participle har spilet)

  1. To dilate.