Last modified on 17 December 2014, at 09:37

squelch

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

squelch (third-person singular simple present squelches, present participle squelching, simple past and past participle squelched)

  1. (transitive, US) to halt, stop, eliminate, stamp out, or put down, often suddenly or by force
    Even the king’s announcement could not squelch the rumors.
    • Beaumont and Fletcher
      Oh 'twas your luck and mine to be squelched.
    • Carlyle
      If you deceive us you will be squelched.
  2. (transitive, radio technology) to suppress the unwanted hiss or static between received transmissions by adjusting the gain of your receiver.
  3. (intransitive, UK) to make a sucking, splashing noise as when walking on muddy ground
    The mud squelched underfoot; it had been raining all night.
    • 1960, P. G. Wodehouse, Jeeves in the Offing, chapter XVI:
      [After they both fell into the lake.] Reaching the mainland some moments later and squelching back to the house, accompanied by Bobbie, like a couple of Napoleons squelching back from Moscow, [...]
  4. (intransitive, UK) to walk or step through a substance such as mud
    The mud was thick and sticky underfoot, but we squelched through it nonetheless.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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NounEdit

squelch (plural squelches)

  1. A squelching sound.

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit