Last modified on 16 May 2015, at 20:34

stench

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English stench, from Old English stenċ (stench, odor, fragrance), from Proto-Germanic *stankwiz (smell, fragrance, odor), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)tewg- (to push, hit). Cognate with Dutch stank (stench, odor), German Stank, Gestank (stench, odor, smell), Danish stank (stench), Swedish stank (stench), Icelandic stækja (stench).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

stench (plural stenches)

  1. a strong foul smell, a stink
  2. (figuratively) a foul quality
    the stench of political corruption
  3. (obsolete) A smell or odour, not necessarily bad.
    • Dryden
      Clouds of savoury stench involve the sky.

SynonymsEdit

  • (disagreeable smell): stink, pong (Commonwealth)

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

stench (third-person singular simple present stenches, present participle stenching, simple past and past participle stenched)

  1. (obsolete) To cause to emit a disagreeable odour; to cause to stink.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Young to this entry?)
  2. To stanch.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Harvey to this entry?)