suppletion

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

Latin supplere (to supply), perfect stem supplet-, + -ion.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

suppletion (uncountable)

  1. The supplying of something lacking.
  2. (grammar) The use of an unrelated word or phrase to supply inflected forms otherwise lacking, e.g. using “to be able” as the infinitive of “can”, or “better” as the comparative of “good”.
  3. (grammar) More loosely, use of unrelated (or distantly related) words for semantically related words which may not share the same lexical category, such as father/paternal or cow/bovine.

Usage notesEdit

Strictly speaking, suppletion in linguistics refers only to inflection, such as good/better, which are both adjectives, and this is the most frequent use. It is also used in the looser sense of semantic relations without etymological relations (or with distant etymological relations) such as father/paternal, where these are noun/adjective.[1][2] However, this latter use is significantly less common and may be considered incorrect.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Paul Georg Meyer (1997) Coming to know: studies in the lexical semantics and pragmatics of academic English, p. 130: "Although many linguists have referred to [collateral adjectives] (paternal, vernal) as 'suppletive' adjectives with respect to their base nouns (father, spring), the nature of ..."
  2. ^ Aspects of the theory of morphology, by David Beck, p. 461
Last modified on 7 October 2013, at 20:21