Last modified on 14 December 2014, at 11:37

triumph

See also: Triumph

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtɹaɪ.ʌmpf/, /ˈtɹaɪ.əmf/
  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French triumphe, from Latin triumphus (triumphal procession), ultimately from Ancient Greek θρίαμβος (thríambos, thriambus).

NounEdit

triumph (plural triumphs)

  1. A conclusive success following an effort, conflict, or confrontation of obstacles; victory; conquest.
    the triumph of knowledge
  2. A magnificent and imposing ceremonial performed in honor of a victor.
  3. (obsolete) Any triumphal procession; a pompous exhibition; a stately show or pageant.
    • Shakespeare
      Our daughter, / In honour of whose birth these triumphs are, / Sits here, like beauty's child.
  4. A state of joy or exultation at success.
    • Milton
      Great triumph and rejoicing was in heaven.
    • Dryden
      Hercules from Spain / Arrived in triumph, from Geryon slain.
  5. (obsolete) A trump card.
  6. A card game, also called trump.
  7. (historical, Ancient Rome) a ceremony held to publicly celebrate and sanctify the military achievement of an army commander.
  8. A work of art, cuisine, etc. of very high quality.
    Scorsese's latest film is a triumph.
    This wedding cake is a triumph.
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin triumphō.

VerbEdit

triumph (third-person singular simple present triumphs, present participle triumphing, simple past and past participle triumphed)

  1. To celebrate victory with pomp; to rejoice over success; to exult in an advantage gained; to exhibit exultation.
    • Bible, Psalms xciv. 3
      How long shall the wicked triumph?
    • Shakespeare
      Sorrow on thee and all the pack of you / That triumph thus upon my misery!
  2. To prevail over rivals, challenges, or difficulties.
  3. To succeed, win, or attain ascendancy.
    • Macaulay
      On this occasion, however, genius triumphed.
  4. To be prosperous; to flourish.
    • Trumbull
      where commerce triumphed on the favouring gales
  5. To play a trump in a card game.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ben Jonson to this entry?)
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Related termsEdit