Last modified on 2 June 2014, at 14:36

vegetal

See also: végétal

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin vegetalis, from Latin vegetāre.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vegetal (comparative more vegetal, superlative most vegetal)

  1. (now rare, historical) Capable of growth and reproduction, but not feeling or reason (often opposed to sensible and rational). [from 15th c.]
    • 1621, Robert Burton, The Anatomy of Melancholy, III.2.1.i:
      Which although it be denominated from men, and most evident in them, yet it extends and shows itself in vegetal and sensible creatures […].
  2. Pertaining to vegetables or plants. [from 16th c.]
  3. (wine) having a grassy, herbaceous taste

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

vegetal (plural vegetals)

  1. (obsolete, chiefly botany) Any vegetable organism.
    • Burton
      This melancholy extends itself not to men only, but even to vegetals and sensibles.

PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

vegetal m (plural vegetais)

  1. vegetable (edible material derived from a plant)
  2. (figuratively) vegetable (person whose body or brain has been damaged so that they cannot interact with the surrounding environment)

SynonymsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vegetal m, f (plural vegetais; comparable)

  1. Relative to plants and vegetables
    Célula vegetal.

SpanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vegetal m, f (plural vegetales)

  1. vegetal

NounEdit

vegetal m (plural vegetales)

  1. vegetable

SynonymsEdit