wonted

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English woonted (usual, customary), from wont (custom, habit, practice), alteration of wone (custom, habit, practice), from Old English wuna (custom, habit, practice", also "usual, wonted), from Proto-Germanic *wunô (custom, practice), from Proto-Indo-European *wenə- (to wish, love). Cognate with Old Frisian wona, wuna (custom), Old High German giwona (custom). More at wont, wone.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

wonted (comparative more wonted, superlative most wonted)

  1. Usual, customary, habitual, or accustomed.
    • 1836, Charles Dickens, Sketches by Boz: illustrative of every-day life and every-day people:
      Rose Villa has once again resumed its wonted appearance; the dining-room furniture has been replaced; the tables are as nicely polished as formerly; the horsehair chairs are ranged against the wall, as regularly as ever [...]
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 2, The Celebrity:
      I had occasion […] to make a somewhat long business trip to Chicago, and on my return […] I found Farrar awaiting me in the railway station. He smiled his wonted fraction by way of greeting, […], and finally leading me to his buggy, turned and drove out of town.
    • 2008, William Dean Howells, A Hazard of New Fortunes:
      Superficially, the affairs of 'Every Other Week' settled into their wonted form again, and for Fulkerson they seemed thoroughly reinstated.
    • 2008 (tr.?), Lodovico Ariosto, Orlando Furioso:
      But not with wonted welcome;—inly moved [...]

TranslationsEdit

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Last modified on 18 April 2014, at 18:39