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Old IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From earlier óac, from Proto-Celtic *yowankos (compare Welsh ieuanc), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂yuh₁n̥ḱós (compare English young).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

óc (comparative óa, superlative óam)

  1. young

InflectionEdit

o/ā-stem
Singular Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative óc óc óc
Vocative óic*
óc**
Accusative óc óic
Genitive óic óice óic
Dative óc óic óc
Plural Masculine Feminine/neuter
Nominative óic óca
Vocative ócu
óca
Accusative ócu
óca
Genitive óc
Dative ócaib
Notes *modifying a noun whose vocative is different from its nominative

**modifying a noun whose vocative is identical to its nominative
† not when substantivized

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

NounEdit

óc m

  1. young man
  2. warrior

InflectionEdit

Masculine o-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative óc ócL óicL
Vocative óic ócL ócuH
Accusative ócN ócL ócuH
Genitive óicL óc ócN
Dative ócL ócaib ócaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
óc unchanged n-óc
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit

C. Marstrander, E. G. Quin et al., editors (1913–76), “óc”, in Dictionary of the Irish Language: Based Mainly on Old and Middle Irish Materials, Dublin: Royal Irish Academy, →ISBN


VietnameseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Vietic *c-ʔɔːk, from Proto-Mon-Khmer *ʔuək ~ *huək (brains). Cognate with Bahnar 'ngok, Nyaheun tʔɔk and Besisi ʔatɔk.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

(classifier bộ, khối) óc (𩠭, 𫇂, 𫘴)

  1. (rather informal or literary) brain (organ)
    Synonym: não
  2. brains (as food)
  3. (in compounds) a sense (of something)
    óc hài hước
    sense of humor

Derived termsEdit

Derived terms