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See also: Sense and sensé

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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English sense, borrowed from Old French sens, sen, san (sense, reason, direction); partly from Latin sensus (sensation, feeling, meaning), from sentiō (feel, perceive); partly of Germanic origin (whence also Occitan sen, Italian senno), from Vulgar Latin *sennus (sense, reason, way), from Old Frankish *sinn (reason, judgement, mental faculty, way, direction), from Proto-Germanic *sinnaz (mind, meaning). Both Latin and Germanic from Proto-Indo-European *sent- (to feel).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sense (countable and uncountable, plural senses)

 
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  1. Any of the manners by which living beings perceive the physical world: for humans sight, smell, hearing, touch, taste.
    • (Can we date this quote?) William Shakespeare
      Let fancy still my sense in Lethe steep.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Milton
      What surmounts the reach / Of human sense I shall delineate.
  2. Perception through the intellect; apprehension; awareness.
    a sense of security
    • (Can we date this quote?) Sir Philip Sidney
      this Basilius, having the quick sense of a lover
    • (Can we date this quote?) John Milton
      high disdain from sense of injured merit
  3. Sound practical or moral judgment.
    It's common sense not to put metal objects in a microwave oven.
    • (Can we date this quote?) L'Estrange
      Some are so hardened in wickedness as to have no sense of the most friendly offices.
  4. The meaning, reason, or value of something.
    You don’t make any sense.
    the true sense of words or phrases
    • Bible, Neh. viii. 8
      So they read in the book in the law of God distinctly, and gave the sense.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Shakespeare
      I think 'twas in another sense.
  5. A natural appreciation or ability.
    A keen musical sense
  6. (pragmatics) The way that a referent is presented.
  7. (semantics) A single conventional use of a word; one of the entries for a word in a dictionary.
  8. (mathematics) One of two opposite directions in which a vector (especially of motion) may point. See also polarity.
  9. (mathematics) One of two opposite directions of rotation, clockwise versus anti-clockwise.
  10. (biochemistry) referring to the strand of a nucleic acid that directly specifies the product.

HyponymsEdit

  • See also Thesaurus:sense
  • Derived termsEdit

    Related termsEdit

    DescendantsEdit

    TranslationsEdit

    The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

    See alsoEdit

    VerbEdit

    sense (third-person singular simple present senses, present participle sensing, simple past and past participle sensed)

    1. To use biological senses: to either smell, watch, taste, hear or feel.
    2. To instinctively be aware.
      She immediately sensed her disdain.
    3. To comprehend.

    TranslationsEdit

    The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

    AnagramsEdit


    AfrikaansEdit

    Etymology 1Edit

    Borrowed from English sense.

    NounEdit

    sense (uncountable)

    1. sense, good sense

    Etymology 2Edit

    NounEdit

    sense

    1. plural of sens

    CatalanEdit

    Alternative formsEdit

    EtymologyEdit

    Ultimately from Latin sine, probably conflated with absentia. Compare French sans, Occitan sens, Italian senza.

    PronunciationEdit

    PrepositionEdit

    sense

    1. without

    AntonymsEdit

    Further readingEdit


    ChuukeseEdit

    EtymologyEdit

    Borrowed from Japanese 先生 (sensei).

    NounEdit

    sense

    1. teacher

    LatinEdit

    ParticipleEdit

    sēnse

    1. vocative masculine singular of sēnsus