Macedonian edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

феномен (fenomenm (relational adjective феноменален)

  1. phenomenon

Declension edit

Russian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Ancient Greek φαινόμενον (phainómenon).

Pronunciation edit

  • фено́мен: IPA(key): [fʲɪˈnomʲɪn]
  • (file)
  • феноме́н: IPA(key): [fʲɪnɐˈmʲen]
  • (file)

Noun edit

фено́мен or феноме́н (fenómen or fenoménm inan (genitive фено́мена or феноме́на, nominative plural фено́мены or феноме́ны, genitive plural фено́менов or феноме́нов, relational adjective феномена́льный)

  1. phenomenon (unusual occurrence)
  2. (colloquial) phenomenon (exceptional person)
  3. (colloquial) paradox

Usage notes edit

The pronunciation with the stress on the second syllable (фено́мен) is more common and is used in the scientific meaning. The pronunciation variant with the stress on the last syllable (феноме́н) is sometimes used to describe an unusual person (usually in a condescending way).

Declension edit

Noun edit

фено́мен (fenómenm inan (genitive фено́мена, nominative plural фено́мены, genitive plural фено́менов)

  1. (philosophy, psychology) phenomenon
    Antonym: ноу́мен (noúmen)

Declension edit

Related terms edit

Serbo-Croatian edit

Noun edit

фено̀ме̄н m (Latin spelling fenòmēn)

  1. phenomenon

Declension edit

Ukrainian edit

 
Ukrainian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia uk

Etymology edit

Derived via Western European languages from Ancient Greek φαινόμενον (phainómenon).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

фено́мен (fenómenm inan (genitive фено́мена, nominative plural фено́мени, genitive plural фено́менів)

  1. phenomenon
    Synonym: я́вище (jávyšče)

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit