Hebrew

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Etymology

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Root
ד־ל־ק (d-l-q)

From דלֵקה (burning); so called due to the heat given off by an inflamed area, and sometimes by the whole body. (Compare English inflammation, and its relation to flame.) The word appears only once in the Bible (see quotation below), as part of a warning to the people of what will happen if they deviate from the path of Torah.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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דַּלֶּקֶת (daléketf (plural indefinite דַּלָּקוֹת) [pattern: קַטֶּלֶת]

  1. An inflammation: an immune reaction to a foreign object or chemical in the body.
    • Deuteronomy 28:22:
      יַכְּכָה ה׳ בַּשַּׁחֶפֶת וּבַקַּדַּחַת וּבַדַּלֶּקֶת וּבַחַרְחֻר וּבַחֶרֶב וּבַשִּׁדָּפוֹן וּבַיֵּרָקוֹן וּרְדָפוּךָ עַד אָבְדֶךָ׃
      yak'khá H. bashakhéfet uvakadákhat uvadaléket uvakharkhúr uvakhérev uvashidafón uvayerakón ur'dafúkha ád av'dékha.
      The L-RD shall smite thee with a consumption, and with a fever, and with an inflammation, and with an extreme burning, and with the sword, and with blasting, and with mildew; and they shall pursue thee until thou perish.
  2. (considered incorrect) Any instance of redness, even one that is not due to an immune response.

Derived terms

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See also

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Further reading

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