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EtymologyEdit

From gay pride.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pɹaɪd/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪd

Proper nounEdit

Pride (plural Prides)

  1. A festival primarily for LGBT people, usually organized annually within a city.
    • 2005, David Campos, Understanding Gay and Lesbian Youth: Lessons for Straight School Teachers, Counselors, and Administrators, R&L Education →ISBN, page 115:
      So you can imagine how I felt about going to Pride. But when Andrea said she wanted to go, I gave it [a] shot.
    • 2006, J. Fish, Heterosexism in Health and Social Care, Springer (→ISBN), page 106:
      Nor are Pride events limited to white, affluent LGBs who can afford high ticket prices: there are youth Prides in the UK, many events have retained their political origins and offer free entry, [...]
    • 2007, Maggie Alderson, Gravity Sucks, Penguin UK →ISBN:
      I'm in New York at the moment (omigod, it's the best place on earth, it's been five years and I'd almost forgotten) and it just happens to be Pride this weekend, which is their version of Mardi Gras, with the big parade and everything, and I just got swept up by it all.
    • 2012, Mark Peterson, Flesh and Blood, Hachette UK →ISBN:
      It's Pride this weekend, Tom, and Brighton will be packed again.
    • 2015, Professor Manon Tremblay, Dr David Paternotte, The Ashgate Research Companion to Lesbian and Gay Activism, Ashgate Publishing, Ltd. →ISBN, page 114:
      And i was goin' out to meet ya, well when i went out to meet you, i felt soooo exposed and such a minority. i never felt like that in Glasgow walkin' in the streets like that, going to Pride ...
  2. A movement encouraging no shame and positive approach to personal identity amongst LGBTQI* peoples.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit