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EnglishEdit

NounEdit

adive (plural adives)

  1. The golden jackal; a smaller sort of jackal, sometimes domesticated.
    • 1830, Georges Louis Leclerc comte de Buffon, The Natural History of Quadrupeds, volume 3, page 104
      We are uncertain whether these two names denote animals of different species. We only know, that the jackal is larger, fiercer, and more difficult to tame than the adive;† but that, in every other article, the resemblance is perfect. Hence the adive may be only the jackal rendered smaller, feebler, and more gentle than the wild race, by being tamed and kept in a domestic state; for the adive is to the jackal nearly what the lap-dog, or small-water-dog, is to the shepherd's dog.

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Via Spanish, from Classical Arabic ذئب

NounEdit

adive m (plural adives)

  1. adive
    • 1869, Victor Hugo, L’Homme qui rit, Part I., Preliminary Chapters, I. "Ursus", section II.
      En outre, un certain relâchement à l’endroit des loups était résulté de la mode des femmes de la cour, sous les derniers Stuarts, d’avoir, en guise de chiens, de petits loups-corsacs, dits adives, gros comme des chats, qu’elles faisaient venir d’Asie à grands frais

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Via Andalusian Arabic, from Classical Arabic ذئب

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /aˈdibe/, [aˈðiβe]

NounEdit

adive m (plural adives)

  1. adive; jackal

Further readingEdit