admissible

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle French admissible.

AdjectiveEdit

admissible (comparative more admissible, superlative most admissible)

  1. Capable or deserving to be admitted, accepted or allowed; allowable, permissible, acceptable.
    • 2018, James Lambert, “Anglo-Indian slang in dictionaries on historical principles”, in World Englishes, volume 37, page 255:
      Moreover, the term [...] is well recorded in British and Australian sources from the 1840s onwards, while the earliest Anglo-Indian evidence only extends as far back as 1865 and so does not hold precedence. Thus, deriving the term from Hindustani is not chronologically admissible on present evidence.
  2. (artificial intelligence) Describing a heuristic that never overestimates the cost of reaching a goal.

AntonymsEdit

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TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Formed from the root of Latin admissus, with the suffix -ible, or based on Old French admissible; cf. Medieval Latin admissibilis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

admissible (masculine and feminine plural admissibles)

  1. admissible

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Formed from admis +‎ -ible; Medieval Latin admissibilis was borrowed from or created based on the French.

AdjectiveEdit

admissible (plural admissibles)

  1. admissible, acceptable

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit