See also: ådrad

Estonian

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Noun

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adrad

  1. nominative plural of ader

Middle English

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Past participle of adreden, from Old English ondrǣdan.

Adjective

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adrad

  1. Full of dread or fear; afraid.

Descendants

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  • English: adread

See also

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References

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Old Irish

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Latin adōrātiō, assimilated to the suffix -ad.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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adrad m (genitive adartho)

  1. verbal noun of ad·ora
  2. worship
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 67b24
      Inna c{h}enél fo·rrorbris, fos·roammámigestar dïa molad ⁊ dïa adrad.
      The peoples whom he has routed, he has subjugated them to his praise and to his worship.

Inflection

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Masculine u-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative adrad adradL adarthae
Vocative adrad adradL adarthu
Accusative adradN adradL adarthu
Genitive adarthoH, adarthaH adartho, adartha adarthaeN
Dative adradL adarthaib adarthaib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Descendants

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Mutation

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Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
adrad unchanged n-adrad
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading

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