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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From awkward +‎ -s. The adjective is formed on the analogy of adverbs and prepositions such as towards, forwards etc.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

awkwards

  1. plural of awkward.

AdjectiveEdit

awkwards (comparative more awkwards, superlative most awkwards)

  1. (rare) awkward, embarrassing, difficult.
    • 1877, Edward Williams Johns, The Silver Wedding: A Romaunt Du Moyen Âge[1], page 190:
      This : " let her own works praise her in the gates" - / Where (being fifty three — these awkwards dates !)
    • 1930, Sir Reginald Rankin, A tour in the Himalayas and beyond[2], page 108:
      We had some awkwards bits to get over to-day. The path at best is a track not two feet wide on the mountain side, and there is no escape from the constantly recurring moraines, with their sharp deep sides eaten away by sub- niveal streams
    • 1980, Charles Parrott, Access to historic buildings for the disabled: suggestions for planning and implementation[3], page 32:
      In the two solutions shown above (a and b) , the first is awkwards, needing a ramp and handrails extending out from the building. In the second, a simple ramp cut into the first stair resulted in a successful solution, which achieved accessibility with minimal impact to the character of the building.

Related termsEdit