banklike

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From bank +‎ -like.

AdjectiveEdit

banklike ‎(comparative more banklike, superlative most banklike)

  1. Having the characteristics of a bank building.
    • 2007 April 26, Ellen Barry, “New Bank Courts in Queens Neighborhood Where Many Have Long Trusted Only in Cash”, in New York Times[1]:
      By yesterday’s opening, the building on 21st Street in Long Island City, Queens — once home to a Kentucky Fried Chicken outlet — seemed distinctly banklike.
  2. (banking, business) Resembling an institution where one can place and borrow money and take care of financial affairs.
    • 2007 June 21, Michael Barbaro, “At Wal-Mart, a Back Door Into Banking”, in New York Times[2]:
      The new products, like the prepaid debit card, will be offered through third-party partners, allowing Wal-Mart to sell banklike services without a government license.
    • 2008 June 13, Louise Story, “As Banks Shun Loans, Hedge Funds Move In”, in New York Times[3]:
      These banklike hedge funds had about $12 billion in assets to lend as of the end of last year, up from $900 million three years ago, according to HedgeFund.net.