From Middle English *bebreken, *bibreken, from Old English bebrecan ‎(to break to pieces), from Proto-Germanic *bibrekaną ‎(to break, shatter), equivalent to be- +‎ break. Cognate with Low German bebreken, German bebrechen.


bebreak ‎(third-person singular simple present bebreaks, present participle bebreaking, simple past bebroke, past participle bebroken)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To break to pieces; break completely; shatter; destroy.
    • 1678, Nicolas Caussin, Hawkins, The Holy Court in Five Tomes:
      This miserable snare staied all his good purposes, and needs must bebreak them, to put this great Soul into full liberty.
    • 2008, Dr Yonah Alexander, Milton M. Hoenig, The New Iranian Leadership:
      Additionally all rulings in the revolutionary and clerical courts are final and cannot bebreak; overturned.
    • 2011, Marie Loughlin, Sandra Bell, Patricia Brace, The Broadview Anthology of Sixteenth-Century Poetry and Prose:
      Did in my hall in sight of least and most Bebreak his staff, my household office stay, Bad each make shift, and rode himself away.