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beclocked

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

be- +‎ clock +‎ -ed

AdjectiveEdit

beclocked (comparative more beclocked, superlative most beclocked)

  1. Having one or more clocks.
    • 1968, Kate Simon, London places & pleasures: an uncommon guidebook, page 63:
      The upper area above the court is heavily beclocked.
    • 2009, Peter Baldwin, The Narcissism of Minor Differences: How America and Europe Are Alike, →ISBN:
      Breslau is arguably the mirror pendant to Milwaukee: each a Germanized town with breweries, a Rathaus, and beclocked church steeples.
    • 2016, Oliver Herford, Henry James's Style of Retrospect: Late Personal Writings, 1890–1915, →ISBN:
      James says that he was at the time 'ignorant of what preceded' the instalment he had happened to pick up and 'was not to know till much later what followed'; and even his alert absorption of these isolated chapters proves compatible with his also having been pleasurably distracted by his Parisian surroundings, which he so well remembers that they have become for him a part of the novel's texture: 'present to me still is the act of standing there, before the fire, with my back against the low beplushed and beclocked French chimneypiece and taking in the tale of the current number, taking it in with so surprised an interest, and perhaps, as well, such a stir of faint foreknowledge, that the sunny little salon, the autumn day, the window ajar, and the cheerful clatter, outside, of the Rue Montaigne, are all now for me more or less in the story, and the story more or less in them'.