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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From be- +‎ feather.

VerbEdit

befeather (third-person singular simple present befeathers, present participle befeathering, simple past and past participle befeathered)

  1. (transitive) To deck or cover with feathers.
    • 1785, John Rickman, Journal of Captain Cook’s Last Voyage, to the Pacific Ocean: on Discovery, London: E. Newbery, Part 2, pp. 223-224,[1]
      The men were not ill made, but they disfigured themselves with grease and coarse paint; they were of a dark copper-colour, with lank black hair, which they tied in a knot behind; but they so bepowdered, or rather befeathered it with down, that the colour was hardly discernible []
    • 1871, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Pink and White Tyranny, Boston: Roberts Brothers, Chapter 25, p. 291,[2]
      In fact, Grace found it very difficult to find a milliner who, if left to her own devices, would not befeather and beflower her past all self-recognition, giving to her that generally betousled and fly-away air which comes straight from the demi-monde of Paris.
    • 2001, Leonard Clark, The Rivers Ran East:
      They were making a human fetish doll out of clay, painting and befeathering it, offering yuca to it.