bibelot

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French bibelot.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bibelot (plural bibelots)

  1. A bauble, knickknack or trinket.
    • 1886, F. Marion Crawford, A Tale of a Lonely Parish, 2012, Project Gutenberg (Tredition Classics), unnumbered page,
      In her own eyes she was indeed living in a state approaching to penury, but the spectacle of her pictures, her furniture and her bibelots had impressed John with a very different idea.
    • 1960, Arthur Kober, George Oppenheimer, A Mighty Man is He, Dramatists Play Service, page 31,
      Barbara's glance now falls on the bibelot, which she picks up. She catches sight of the curtain and, bibelot in hand, goes to align it. She suddenly becomes aware of the bibelot in her hand.
    • 2008, Willa Z. Silverman, The New Bibliopolis: French Book Collectors and the Culture of Print, 1880–1914, University of Toronto Press, page 191,
      Excluded from the world of 'true,' high culture, women, it was claimed, loved books primarily as bibelots, like silks, lace, sconces, fans, or porcelain.
  2. A miniature book of an elegant design.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From an onomatopoeic root bib-. Compare English bauble and Old French baubel.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bi.blo/
  • (file)

NounEdit

bibelot m (plural bibelots)

  1. knick-knack, bauble

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


PolishEdit

 
Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

EtymologyEdit

From French bibelot.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bibelot m inan (diminutive bibelocik)

  1. bibelot, knick-knack

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • bibelot in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • bibelot in Polish dictionaries at PWN